KML Maps – Slideshow

I can’t resist.  This is just a post of images from Kevin’s new Google Earth version of his maps.  If you haven’t already read his post do so here as the info about the quality (number of years used to derive a trend) is important.  Briefly – Version 1 <10 years = no trend; Version 2 <50 years = no trend.

Key to colours used in the KML files

Before showing the maps, let me remind you that there is strong evidence for multidecadal trends in worldwide climate data. Cyclical warming and cooling periods show up in many individual data sets (for example here and here) with the possible influence of the PDO and AMO.  This being the case, more than 60 years of data is desirable to capture a full cycle.  These maps show just how woefully inadequate the GHCNv2 data set is in meeting this criterion.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Of course in Google Earth they’re not just static pictures – they’re interactive.  Zooming in brings up the station names and clicking on a station marker will bring up a graph of the station data.  Now go on – download the KML files – you know you want to 😉

Files downloadable here: http://www.climateapplications.com/kmlfiles.asp

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This entry was posted in Mapping, Station Data, Trends and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to KML Maps – Slideshow

  1. tonyb says:

    Good stuff. Hours of harmless enjoyment and relaxation looking at the maps. Perhaps we can get it prescribed on the NHS?

    tonyb

  2. Ruhroh says:

    There was one particular view that really brought it all home to me.

    I guess I don’t know what fraction of the earth is visible in the nominal view, but somehow I ended up staring at a view that was purely Pacific ocean, with a very sparse smattering of colored dots.

    Just NZ on the lower left, and Hawaii vanishing on the upper left, and a whole lotta dot-less blue ocean. A place called Mururoa in the ~center.

    Garsh, that seems to really undercut the whole idea of measuring a global average temperature. Just makes a farce of the whole exercise, to me anyway…
    And with water being such a marvelous absorber of heat, I just think that Ocean Heat Content would seem to tell the real story.

    I wonder how hard it would be to put data from thermal buoys on the same kind of display.
    The patterns of red dots do seem to have odd relationships to geopolitical borders…
    Awesome, thanks for the effort.
    I’ve tried some of this and know how hard it is, even when you do the ‘smart way’ instead of the plug-and-grind method.
    Powerful stuff.
    RR

  3. KevinUK says:

    Verity,

    This is a great thread! Thank you for combining the images from the different Google Earth KML files so that it demonstrates the almost total inadequacy of the GHCN dataset to demonstrate so called global warming over the last 130 years.

    Don’t get me wrong, I’m not denying that multi-decadal warming and cooling trends exist, they clearly do. What is still very much in doubt based on my personal analysis of the warming/cooling trends over the last 130 years is that the late 20th century warming trend is anyway ‘unprecedented’ within even the last 130 years let alone 1000 years as claimed by certain IPCC climatologists.

    As your slideshow shows, how can it be possible to claim that the late 20th century warming period is ‘unprecedented’ even within the last 130 years when in fact no data exists for the vast majority (the white dot stations) of stations prior to 1950 in the GHCN dataset?

    Ruhroh,

    “The patterns of red dots do seem to have odd relationships to geopolitical borders…

    You are absolutely right, there are clear relationships between the colours of the dots and country boundaries – for example why should climate change so much as you cross the 49th parallel between the US and Canada and between Northern China and Mongolia? This is very suspicious and Verity and I have been looking at this issue and will post on it shortly.

  4. tonyb says:

    Kevin said;

    “What is still very much in doubt based on my personal analysis of the warming/cooling trends over the last 130 years is that the late 20th century warming trend is anyway ‘unprecedented’ within even the last 130 years let alone 1000 years as claimed by certain IPCC climatologists.”

    Previously I was of the opinion that the world had warmed gently over recent centuries, which is not surprising as we came out of the LIA, and that over the last 40 years that trend had been accentuated (but was still nothing unusual historically)

    However over the last five years-and particularly since running my own site gathering historic temperature records-I could no longer be certain that many periods of the 18th, 19th and 20th Century were really very much different to today. Warmest in 1000 years? I doubt it.

    Tonyb

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